Disposable Slings | Hygienic Patient Lifting

Joerns Healthcare is a world-leading supplier of patient handling and rehabilitation equipment. Our company is committed to manufacturing and supplying equipment that meets the care requirements of patients. Consequently, truly enhancing their lives. Our slings are designed and made, with careful attention paid to ergonomic principles, comfort, and safety.

Slings can support with a range of moving and handling scenarios such as:

  • Standing up from a chair
  • Getting in and out of a bath or pool
  • Toileting transfers
  • Bed to chair transfers

Within this scope, certain sling models and material options can help cater for patient specific conditions. For instance, this might be things like amputee compatibility, tissue viability, head and trunk control levels and behavioural issues. Typically, a care plan will specify the equipment needs of each individual.

Qualified Sling Selection

Choosing the most suitable sling can be a tricky task when there are so many models and variations available. At Joerns Healthcare we have an invaluable and free online tool that can help you make a more qualified decision. The tool requires you to answer a series of multiple-choice questions based around the patient’s needs. As well as, the environment and task in hand. After that, it determines the most suitable sling(s) to accommodate those demands. If you’re interested in our sling selection, why not use our Oxford Sling Selector tool.

Oxford Disposable Slings

As well as more traditional launder-able slings for hoists, Joerns have a range of disposable slings, designed for single patient use. These slings are more commonly in use, in acute and large nursing facilities. They help avoid cross-infection risks and are not suitable for washing or cleaning.

Our disposable slings have been designed for single patient application. However, as with all of our lifting and handling equipment, these slings are still designed to achieve the highest levels of comfort and safety during transfer. Oxford disposable slings are available in loop and clip variants. In addition, the disposable slings are compatible with a range of patient hoists and associated spreader bar/cradle combinations.

 

Disposable Slings Improve Infection Control 

Alongside the same benefits that multi-use slings can provide, the core benefit that disposable slings have is that they can support care facilities in achieving improved infection control. With the sling being used by just one person, cross contamination risks are largely eliminated.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, disposable slings have played an important role in patient protection. They have been in use across hospitals and care home environments. When the sling become soiled, wet, or when the patient no longer needs it, they can be disposed. Therefore, in accordance with infection control protocols.

Disposable slings are also less costly in comparison to their washable counterparts. In addition, can provide significant cost savings for facilities. There are no associated laundering expenses, and they are much easier to store prior to initial use.

Here at Joerns Healthcare, you can choose from four different types of disposable sling models that cater for a range of patient needs:

  • Comfort Sling (Passive style / Clip attachment) SWL 227kg / 35st
  • Full Back Sling (Passive style / Loop attachment) SWL 227kg / 35st
  • Quickfit Deluxe Sling (Passive style / Loop attachment) SWL 227kg / 35st
  • Deluxe Standing Sling (Active style / Loop attachment) SWL 200kg / 31st

We offer these slings in a range of sizes from XS – XL and have colour-coded binding for quick reference. There are models to suit both passive style hoists and active stand aids, and clip and loop attachment options as listed above.

Contact Us Today

For more information on our disposable slings for hoists, please visit our website today, or call +44 (0)344 811 1158 to speak to a member of our helpful and friendly team.

If you have found this blog helpful, then you may wish to read a related blog on Sling Selection: Getting it Right.